OUR GUNS

Handguns


GLOCK 17C

The Glock pistol, sometimes referred to by the manufacturer as Glock “Safe Action” Pistol, is a semi-automatic pistol designed and produced by Glock Ges.m.b.H., located in Deutsch-Wagram, Austria. Glock commands 65% of the market share of handguns for United States law enforcement agencies as well as supplies numerous national armed forces and security agencies worldwide. The Glock 17 is the original 9×19mm Parabellum model, with a standard magazine capacity of 17 rounds. The Glock 17C was introduced in 1996 and incorporated slots cut in the barrel and slide to compensate for muzzle rise and recoil.

S&W MODEL 500 .50 MAGNUM

The Smith & Wesson Model 500 is a five-shot, single action/double-action large caliber revolver produced by Smith & Wesson, firing the .500 S&W Magnum cartridge, a .50 caliber bullet. It is the most powerful production revolver in the world today, and it is being marketed as being “the world’s most powerful handgun” by the manufacturer. The Model 500 is suitable for sport and hunting applications. The high energy of these rounds make it possible to hunt extremely large African game successfully.


Specialty Guns


BROWNING .50 CAL

The M2 Machine Gun or Browning .50 Caliber Machine Gun, is a heavy machine gun designed towards the end of World War I by John Browning. The M2 uses the .50 BMG cartridge, which was developed alongside and takes its name from the gun itself (BMG standing for Browning Machine Gun). The M2 has been referred to as “Ma Deuce”, or “the fifty” in reference to its caliber. It is effective against infantry, unarmored or lightly armored vehicles and boats, light fortifications and low-flying aircraft.
The Browning .50 caliber machine gun has been used extensively as a vehicle weapon and for aircraft armament by the United States from the 1920s to the present. It was heavily used during World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and during the Iraq War and War in Afghanistan in the 2000s and 2010s. It is the primary heavy machine gun of NATO countries, and has been used by many other countries. The M2 has been in use longer than any other small arm in U.S. inventory except the .45 ACP M1911 pistol, also designed by John Browning.

M203 GRENADE LAUNCHER

The M203 is a single shot 40 mm grenade launcher designed to attach to a rifle. It uses the same rounds as the older stand-alone M79 break-action grenade launcher, which utilizes the High-Low Propulsion System to keep recoil forces low. Though versatile, and compatible with many rifle models, the M203 was originally designed for the U.S. M16 and its variant, the M4 Carbine.

DRAGUNOV SVD

The Dragunov sniper rifle SVD (Snayperskaya Vintovka Dragunova, literally “Dragunov’s sniper rifle”) is a semi-automatic sniper rifle/designated marksman rifle chambered in 7.62×54mmR and developed in the Soviet Union. The Dragunov was designed as a squad support weapon, since according to Soviet and Soviet-derived military doctrines the long-range engagement ability was lost to ordinary troops when submachine guns and assault rifles (which are optimized for close-range and medium-range, rapid-fire combat) were adopted. For that reason it was originally named “Dragunov’s Semi-Automatic Rifle”. Since 1963 the Dragunov has become the standard squad support weapon of several countries, including those of the former Warsaw Pact.


Machine Guns


AK-47

The AK-47 is a selective-fire, gas-operated 7.62×39mm assault rifle, first developed in the USSR by Mikhail Kalashnikov. Even after six decades the model and its variants remain the most widely used and popular assault rifles in the world because of their durability, low production cost, and ease of use. It has been manufactured in many countries and has seen service with armed forces as well as irregular forces worldwide.

COLT M-16

The M16 rifle, officially designated Rifle, Caliber 5.56 mm, M16, is the United States military version of the AR-15 rifle. The rifle was adapted for semi-automatic, three-round burst, and full-automatic fire. The M16 fires the 5.56×45mm NATO cartridge. The rifle entered United States Army service and was deployed for jungle warfare operations in South Vietnam in 1963, becoming the U.S. military’s standard service rifle of the Vietnam War by 1969, replacing the M14 rifle in that role. Since the Vietnam War, the M16 rifle family has been the primary service rifle of the U.S. armed forces and has also been widely adopted by other militaries around the world. In 2010, the M16 began to be phased out in the U.S. Army and is being supplemented by the M4 carbine, which is itself a shortened derivative of the M16A2.

M-4

The M4 is a shortened variant of the M16A2 rifle, it has a 14.5 inch barrel, allowing its user to better operate in close quarters combat. The M4 carbine is heavily used by the U.S military. It is slated to eventually replace the M16 rifle for most combat units in the United States Army.

FN FAL

The Fusil Automatique Léger (“Light Automatic Rifle”) or FAL is a self-loading, selective fire battle rifle produced by the Belgian armaments manufacturer Fabrique Nationale de Herstal (FN). During the Cold War it was adopted by many North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries, with the notable exception of the United States. It is one of the most widely used rifles in history, having been used by over 90 countries.
The FAL was predominantly chambered for the 7.62×51mm NATO round, and because of its prevalence and widespread use among the armed forces of many NATO countries during the Cold War it was nicknamed “The right arm of the Free World”.


.50 Cal


DESERT EAGLE .50 CAL

The Israel Military Industries Desert Eagle is a large-framed gas-operated semi-automatic pistol designed by Magnum Research in the US. The handgun is fed with a detachable magazine. Magazine capacity is 9 rounds in .357 Magnum, 8 rounds in .44 Magnum, and 7 rounds in .50 Action Express. The Desert Eagle’s barrel features polygonal rifling. The pistol is primarily used for hunting, target shooting, and silhouette shooting. The Desert Eagle has been featured in more than 500 motion pictures, television shows, and video games.

S&W MODEL 500 .50 MAGNUM

The Smith & Wesson Model 500 is a five-shot, single action/double-action large caliber revolver produced by Smith & Wesson, firing the .500 S&W Magnum cartridge, a .50 caliber bullet. It is the most powerful production revolver in the world today, and it is being marketed as being “the world’s most powerful handgun” by the manufacturer. The Model 500 is suitable for sport and hunting applications. The high energy of these rounds make it possible to hunt extremely large African game successfully.

BARRETT M82 A1 .50 CAL SNIPER RIFLE

The M107 is a recoil-operated, semi-automatic anti-materiel rifle developed by the American Barrett Firearms Manufacturing company. A heavy SASR (Special Application Scoped Rifle), it is used by many units and armies around the world. It is also called the “Light Fifty” for its .50 caliber BMG (12.7 × 99 mm) chambering.


Belt Fed


M249

The M249 light machine gun (LMG), previously designated the M249 Squad Automatic Weapon (SAW), and formally written as Light Machine Gun, 5.56 mm, M249, is an American version of the Belgian FN Minimi. The M249 is manufactured in the United States and is widely used by the U.S. Armed Forces. The M249 provides infantry squads with the heavy volume of fire of a machine gun combined with accuracy and portability approaching that of a rifle.

PKM

The PKM is a 7.62 mm general-purpose machine gun designed in the Soviet Union and currently in production in Russia. The PK machine gun was introduced in the 1960s and replaced the SGM and RPD machine guns in Soviet service. It remains in use as a front-line infantry and vehicle-mounted weapon with Russia’s armed forces.


Sub Machine Guns


HK MP-5K

The MP-5K compact submachine gun (K stands for “Kurz” in German, that means “short”) had been developed by the German company Heckler-Koch for various counter-terror and security units, that needed a short-range weapon with serious firepower. The HK MP-5K can be easily concealed under the clothes, in the glove compartment of a car, or in the special carry/fire suitcase. It also allows the high mobility in the confined spaces and in the crowd. MP-5K is widely used by various Law Enforcement and VIP protection units worldwide.

STEN

The STEN (or Sten gun) was a family of British 9 mm submachine guns used extensively by British and Commonwealth forces throughout World War II and the Korean War. They were notable for having a simple design and very low production cost making them effective insurgency weapons for resistance groups. STEN is an acronym, from the names of the weapon’s chief designers, Major Reginald V. Shepherd and Harold Turpin, and EN for Enfield.[1] Over 4 million Stens in various versions were made in the 1940s.

UZI

The Uzi is a family of Israeli open-bolt, blowback-operated submachine guns. Smaller variants are considered to be machine pistols. The Uzi was one of the first weapons to use a telescoping bolt design which allows the magazine to be housed in the pistol grip for a shorter weapon.
The first Uzi submachine gun was designed by Major Uziel Gal in the late 1940s. The prototype was finished in 1950. First introduced to IDF special forces in 1954, the weapon was placed into general issue two years later. The Uzi has found use as a personal defense weapon by rear-echelon troops, officers, artillery troops and tankers, as well as a frontline weapon by elite light infantry assault forces.
The Uzi has been exported to over 90 countries. Over its service lifetime, it has been manufactured by Israel Military Industries, FN Herstal, and other manufacturers. From the 1960s through the 1980s, more Uzi submachine guns were sold to more military and police markets than any other submachine gun ever made.